Q&A with Weemagine Co-Founders Rick and Faye McCray

Meet Weemagine Co-Founders, Rick and Faye McCray and learn more about them and what inspired them to create Weemagine.

Meet Weemagine Co-Founders, Rick and Faye McCray and learn more about them and what inspired them to create Weemagine.

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Q. Tell us a little bit about yourselves.

Faye: I’m originally from Queens, New York. I currently reside in the D.C. Metro Area. My parents divorced when I was a kid so I was primarily raised by my mom.  I was raised with two phenomenal older brothers. One of which became my angel in 2009.  I was the first of my siblings to go to college and as far as know, the first law school graduate in my family (though I’m sure this new generation of kids in my family will far surpass me).  My parents were married young but they both went back to school as adults which has always been a tremendous source of inspiration for me.  I went to an HBCU for law school and majority institution for undergrad.  I  am a devoted wife and mom. I also work full time as an attorney, and I am also a published author. In my spare time, I love to ride my bike, have brunch, and throw impromptu dance parties with my kids.

Rick: I’m originally from North Carolina. My folks also divorced when I was young, but interestingly enough they remarried each other and moved back in together when my sister and I were attending college.  My mother raised my younger sister and me.  My father unexpectedly passed away in mid-2016.  Both of my parents went to HBCUs and like Faye and I, they met at Howard University School of Law.  I love reading, specifically historical biographies of business people. I love anything involving real estate. I also love watching inspirational videos on YouTube.

Q. Where did you meet? How long have you been married?

Faye: Rick and I met our first year of law school at Howard University School of Law. We officially met at a birthday party of a mutual friend but I always tease him that he introduced himself to me (and all the girls) in the library before then. We have been together 13 years and married for 10.

Rick: Our first date was to the final Matrix movie.  It was great because my wife, (then girl I was trying to date), was driving and we got lost.  I got to practice some of my best humor on her, which is obviously why she fell in love with me!  We both agreed how bad the movie was so we bonded over that and by the end of the movie, we wanted to see more of each other. On a side note, our date almost never happened.  My wife thought I was very weird and tried to get every friend she could think of to go on the date with her, like a dang chaperone!  Thankfully, all of her girlfriends said no and she was forced to enjoy my company by herself.

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Q. How many children do you have?

Rick: We have two boys and another baby boy due in November 2016.

Faye: This is a rainbow baby for us. We had a miscarriage in December 2015 so this baby and pregnancy has been an absolute blessing.

“We wanted to provide positive and helpful information, everyday, that would help other parents inspire their children no matter what was going on in the outside world.  It is something that we were seeking that we didn’t see enough of. We decided to provide it because we knew if we were looking for it, other parents were too.”

Q. Why did you start Weemagine?

Rick: We started Weemagine because we wanted a place that was specifically catering to parents of children of color. We wanted to provide positive and helpful information, everyday, that would help other parents inspire their children no matter what was going on in the outside world.  It is something that we were seeking that we didn’t see enough of. We decided to provide it because we knew if we were looking for it, other parents were too.

Faye: Well, my reason is probably more emotional. As a mother of brown boys, I was afraid. I am afraid. Every video, shooting, arrest, and acquittal was hitting me emotionally. I felt like I was drowning.  I wanted to be part of the solution.  Weemagine began as a Facebook group called Celebrating Black Boys.  The group was primarily friends and friends of friends looking to celebrate our beautiful sons. We would share pictures and good news. We created a Facebook page shortly after to allow other people to share their stories. We started digging through the news to bring positive stories of black boys and men to inspire our growing community. Weemagine launched in 2016 as a part of a bigger mission to celebrate and inspire all of our children and the people who love them. We couldn’t escape that moms of little girls were feeling the burden too. We wanted to unite as a community.

Q. What does the name Weemagine mean?

Rick: To me, it means creating the world as we want to see it. It means a place where our children are safe, creative, fun and celebrated.  It is a collective feeling of “this is our space to enjoy.”

Faye: It’s also a play on the words “We” and “Imagine”.  The extra “e” is because our goal has always been the babies!  “Wee” means little.

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Q. Why now?

Rick: Why not now? We see negative imagery all the time, and we rarely see solutions.  We feel like our site is our way of showing solutions.  It shows parents how to live in this moment empowered and compassionate.

Faye: I agree. We need sites like Weemagine now. We are such a resilient, spirited people.  I think once we have solutions, we work towards them.  This is just one small solution. Let’s love our babies. Let’s raise them to be proud and strong.  Let’s work together to find inspiration and positivity.

Q. Who do you hope to reach?

Rick: I want to reach young mothers and fathers who are afraid for their children. I’d like to reach grandparents who are raising grandchildren who want to know how to relate to this generation.  I want to reach anyone who is seeking solutions and ways to make the environment better for children in our society.

Faye: Right. Our goal has always been to celebrate and inspire the babies. That necessarily involves inspiring parents and other people who love and have access to them.

“We are such a resilient, spirited people.  I think once we have solutions, we work towards them.  This is just one small solution. Let’s love our babies. Let’s raise them to be proud and strong.  Let’s work together to find inspiration and positivity.”

Q. As a mother, what do you hope to bring to Weemagine?

Faye: I have been a mom for nine years. I am by no means a veteran but I am proud of the experience and knowledge I have gained. I hope I inspire conversation. I want to be honest about what has worked for me but also my shortcomings as a parent. Also, as a woman, I am incredibly inspired by other women. I hope to bring stories of moms overcoming obstacles, trusting their intuition, and giving their babies the best life they can.

Q. As a father, what do you hope to bring to Weemagine?

Rick: I want to bring a positive male perspective. I want to show a black father who is 100% there for his kids and doesn’t just discipline but loves. That’s my reality and that’s the reality for guys I know.

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Q. What are your short term goals?

Rick: We want to increase our viewership, continue to put out great content, and get the word out. There are more people that don’t know that we exist than do.  There is a huge opportunity for growth.

Q. What are your long term goals?

Faye: Certainly to spread positivity to a larger audience. I’d like to spread our content throughout social media, including videos. I’d like to meet more people and share their stories.  As an author, I’d also like Weemagine to play a role in spreading diverse literature, whether its original content or as a resource for finding positive images of our children.

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About The Author

Faye McCray is anMcCray_AuthorPhoto (1) attorney by day and writer all the time. Her work has been featured on My Brown Baby, AfroPunk, AfroNews, For HarrietMadame NoireBlack Girl NerdsBlack and Married with Kids, and other popular publications.  Faye also has a number of short stories and a full length novel available for purchase on Amazon.  Most importantly, Faye is a proud wife and mother to three beautiful and talented young boys who she is fiercely passionate about raising. You can find Faye on Twitter @fayewrites and on the web at fayemccray.com.

Minute Mentor: School Counselor Tanefa Wallace

Minute Mentor provides a space for real people to tell their stories so if you or your little one is in search of mentorship on how to achieve their dreams, you can look no further than right here! Sometimes the best inspiration comes from seeing someone that looks like you achieving similar goals.

Minute Mentor is a series of posts profiling real people achieving their dreams. It began with the simple idea that “seeing is being.”  When cofounders Rick and Faye’s oldest son was born, it was clear he was musically inclined. He was playing piano by ear at age 4 and neither of them ever even picked up an instrument! When Faye remembered an old neighbor who had gone on to become a Julliard trained musician, she immediately reached out to him and said, “What do we do?”  He patiently answered all of her questions on how best to nurture her budding musician.

Minute Mentor provides a space for real people to tell their stories so if you or your little one is in search of mentorship on how to achieve their dreams, you can look no further than right here! Sometimes the best inspiration comes from seeing someone that looks like you achieving similar goals.

If you have any questions or comments for the featured guest, leave a comment, and we will do our best to bring it to their attention! Happy imagining!

Name: Tanefa Wallace

Age: 40 and over

Occupation: School Counselor

Career Level:

  • Entry
  • Mid-level
  • Executive
  • Entrepreneur
  • Retired

How hard do you work? 

  • Lots of Leisure Time
  • Typical 40-50hr Workweek
  • More than Average
  • I never stop working

Lifestyle/Income: 

  • Side Hustle/Didn’t Quit My Day Job
  • Getting By
  • My bills are Paid with Some Room for Fun
  • You get a car! You get a car!

Describe your job:

I am a [high school] counselor, so that means that I wipe tears over lost boyfriends and “crazy” parents, and I help students keep their grades up and focus on goals to reach college. I also help students apply [to college] and figure out where to apply to be the most successful.

What education level is required for your job? Tests? Certificates? Years of School?

In order to do my job you have to have a [Bachelor’s] degree and a Master’s degree. You also have to be certified as a School Counselor by the educational district where you are working. In order to maintain your certification, you have to complete at least 6 continuing education credits in your field or CEUs through workshops in your field. The years of school add up! There are 4 for undergrad and 2 for graduate/masters work, then you have to continue to go back to school or to trainings to stay sharp and above the fray! Some schools require exit exams, and if you want to become a Nationally Certified School Counselor, you have to take an exam that qualifies you for that level of work.

“I find that when you are new to your field or want to be cutting edge, you have to seek out the people who are doing what you do well.”

What kind of student were you?

I was [an] on again off again student. I had a childhood that was fraught with trauma so there was a lot of times where I didn’t want to be in school and didn’t live up to my potential as a student. I was a B student with a few Cs here and there but it didn’t reflect my ability levels at all.  I was exceptional on all of the standardized testings and was even awarded a full academic ride to an HBCU, including room and board.

Did you have a mentor? How did you meet?

I have one now. I met her through a recommendation. I have had one in every job I have ever had. I find that when you are new to your field or want to be cutting edge, you have to seek out the people who are doing what you do well. Befriend them, get them to give you all of their secrets, and show them your appreciation in ways they will enjoy.

How did you get your current job?

I was picked out of 300 applicants based on my interview and resume.

Is your job family-friendly?

I am able to be a parent and do it without too much pressure. I am in the school system [so] I have the same days off and summers and winter break [as my children].  So, I would say yes, it is very family friendly.

Do you find your work fulfilling?

Yes! I love it. I thoroughly enjoy bonding with the students and assisting them navigate life as they know it, the processes of getting to their goal schools, and [their] lives once they graduate. It gives me a sense of purpose and allows me to use my gifts in service to students and families.

Did you always know you wanted to be a school counselor?

No! I wanted to be a radio DJ. I love music, and [I] love interacting with those types of creative folks. After all, I am a creative as well on my own time.

What advice would you give a parent of a child/young adult interested in pursuing a job in your field? 

Make sure you are doing it for the right reasons: love of children and students, a passion to serve educationally, work with the general public, a strong urge to be organized and assist students to reach their goals. Being a highly organized person is a plus! I would also state that being certified and attending an accredited institution would be beneficial to being able to do your job efficiently by creating a strong knowledge base.

You can find out more about Tanefa Wallace:

On Instagram: @Soul_On_Purpose
On Facebook: www.facebook.com/SoulOnPurpose
On the Web: www.SoulOnPurpose.wix.com/soulonpurpose

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About The Author

Faye McCray is anMcCray_AuthorPhoto (1) attorney by day and writer all the time. Her work has been featured on My Brown Baby, AfroPunk, AfroNews, For HarrietMadame NoireBlack Girl NerdsBlack and Married with Kids, and other popular publications.  Faye also has a number of short stories and a full length novel available for purchase on Amazon.  Most importantly, Faye is a proud wife and mother to three beautiful and talented young boys who she is fiercely passionate about raising. You can find Faye on Twitter @fayewrites and on the web at fayemccray.com.

 

Activism through the Arts: Meet Veteran Actor Tim Reid

As a 90’s kid, I can’t look at Tim Reid without thinking of him as the dad from Sister, Sister. However, after getting a peek into his remarkable life on a recent episode of TV One’s Unsung Hollywood, I had to learn more! Tim Reid is an actor, producer and director whose career has spanned over four decades. His integrity shines through his work. Here are a few facts about his life:

As a 90’s kid, I can’t look at Tim Reid without thinking of him as the dad from Sister, Sister.  However, after getting a peek into his remarkable life on a recent episode of TV One’s Unsung Hollywood, I had to learn more! Tim Reid is an actor, producer and director whose career has spanned over four decades.  His integrity shines through his work.  Here are a few facts about his life:

1. He overcame a tumultuous childhood.

Timothy Isabel Jr. was born on December 19, 1944 in Norfolk, Virginia.  He was named after his mother’s fiancee who was a soldier in World War II.  In 1948, his mother married a man who became abusive and would frequently beat her in front of Reid.  His mother feared for his safety, so she sent him to live with his aunt who ran a brothel. Reid would provide entertainment for the patrons by dancing for nickels. In 1953, Reid went to live with his maternal grandmother back in Virginia who sold alcohol illegally and ran an unlicensed boardinghouse.

2. He worked for Martin Luther King, Jr.

After falling in with a bad crowd, Reid went to live with his biological father, William Lee Reid.  While living with his father, he was recruited as a bodyguard for Martin Luther King, Jr.  He credits Dr. King with changing his life.  He became involved with the Civil Rights Movement, straightened up his life, and graduated high school.  He enrolled in Norfolk State University in 1963.  That same year, he also attended the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.  He later became President of the Student Chapter of the NAACP at his university.

3. His entertainment career started unexpectedly.

In 1968, after graduating Norfolk State University with a Bachelor of Science in Business/Marketing, he went to work for DuPont, a well-known chemical company, as a marketing representative.  He was the first Black person recruited by the company from a Historically Black College or University.  While at Dupont, he met a white insurance agent named Tom Dreesen while working for an outreach program in local schools about the ills of drug use.  Reid and Dressen’s presentations were so well-received, the men formed a comedy team and toured nightclubs with their act called “Tim and Tom.”  It is believed to be the first interracial comedy duo in the United States.  “Tim and Tom” toured together for about six years before they each decided to move on to other projects.

4. He worked on the Richard Pryor Show.

In 1977, Reid was cast in Richard Pryor’s 10-episode sketch comedy series called the Richard Pryor Show.  Reid and Pryor related over their similar background of poverty and abuse.  Interestingly, they both spent portions of their childhood in brothels.  Reid cites the show as being a strange experience that broadened his views on the possibilities of artistic creativity.  In that short time he was able to work with young comedy legends like Richard Pryor, Paul Mooney,  John Witherspoon and Robin Williams.

5. He fought against stereotyping in his iconic role on WKRP in Cincinnati.

In 1978, Reid was able to land the role of Venus Flytrap, an energetic disc jockey, on WKRP in Cincinnati.  Upon his initial audition, Reid recognized the character as a stereotype with little substance.  He actively fought against this and argued that he should be allowed to control his character.  The director eventually agreed and Reid was able to not only act as he saw fit, but also write several episodes in the series.  In one episode he co-wrote called “Venus and the Man,” he encouraged a gang member to leave street life behind and return to high school.  Several teachers’ organizations lauded the episode. Scenes from the episode were remade in comic book form and featured in Scholastic magazine.

6. He frequently collaborates with his wife, Daphne Maxwell Reid.

Reid married model and actress, Daphne Maxwell Reid on December 4, 1982.  Mrs. Reid was the first Black woman named Homecoming Queen at Northwestern University and the first Black woman to appear on the cover of Glamour magazine.  She has appeared in several television shows and movies, but her most famous role was as Vivian Banks (the Second Aunt Viv) on the 90’s television classic, The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air.  The duo started appearing in shows together as early as WKRP in Cincinnati.  When Mr. Reid became a regular on the television series Simon & Simon, playing Lieutenant Marcel “Downtown” Brown, Mrs. Reid was cast as his girlfriend, a television reporter named Temple Hill.

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7. He executive produced and starred in Frank’s Place, a critically acclaimed television show in the 80s.

In 1988, after a brief hiatus from acting, Reid executive produced and starred in Frank’s Place, a comedy-drama set in New Orleans. The show chronicled the life of Frank Parrish (Reid), an African American professor at Brown University who inherits a restaurant in New Orleans. The show lasted 22 episodes and was critically acclaimed. He received an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actor in a Comedy Series.  TV Guide ranked Frank’s Place number 3 on it’s 2013 list of shows canceled too soon.

8. Long before Tyler Perry, Reid opened his own film studio.

In 1996, while working on the television series, Sister, Sister, Reid and his wife started New Millennium Studios in Petersburg, VA.  The facility was a 14,850 square foot studio that resides on almost 60 acres.  At their studio, which was sold in 2015, the Reids created 14 documentaries and several television shows and films were shot there, including parts of Steven Spielberg’s critically acclaimed film, Lincoln.  Though the Reid’s sold their studio in 2015, they continue to create in smaller spaces and mentor others in the film making industry.

9. Legacy Media Institute is Tim Reid’s way of giving back.

In 2011, Reid formed Legacy Media Institute, a nonprofit dedicated to educating young filmmakers and artists on the entertainment business.  Prior to selling his studio, he would invite young artists attending Norfolk State University, Virginia State University, and other local universities to use the facilities of New Millennium Studios.  After selling the studio, his wife commented that the Reid’s would continue to work to ensure the students would have access to the equipment and space they needed to continue to learn and grow.

Information attained from:

Leah Small, “Movie making couple Tim and Daphne Reid sell New Millennium Studios”, Published on Jan. 7, 2016, http://www.progress-index.com/news/20150507/movie-making-couple-tim-and-daphne-reid-sell-new-millennium-studios

Michael B. Kassel, Museum of Broadcast Communications, Reid, Reid “U.S. Actor/Producer”, http://www.museum.tv/eotv/reidtim.htm

Tim Reid’s Biography, http://www.simon-and-simon.info/laurasappreciation/timreid.HTM

Michigan Chronicle,”Tim Reid and Daphne Maxwell Reid, a talented and enduring couple”, http://michronicleonline.com/2014/12/03/tim-reid-and-daphne-maxwell-reid-a-talented-and-enduring-couple/

The Richard Pryor Show, http://www.tv.com/shows/the-richard-pryor-show/

Tim Reid Productions Inc., http://www.timreidproductions.com/biography.htm

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About The Author

Rick McCray is a maRAMrried father of three amazing sons. He is also a proud graduate of Duke University where he holds a BA in History and African/African American History, and Howard University School of Law. He is also a regular commentator on the In The Black podcast.  Rick is passionate about our history and helping to educate our community concerning the great contributions of people of color to the world. You can find Rick on Twitter @RealRickMcCray.

Cracking the Introverted Child: Getting Your Tween to Open Up

As a tween life can run the gamut of emotions. Our children often have the additional burden of processing other people’s microaggressions and stereotypes that aren’t always easy for a young mind to understand. It is important to me that my son knows I am available to listen whenever he needs me. Here are some tricks I have learned to get my son to open up.

Even when raised in the same family, children can be vastly different. They are unique and their little personalities take shape well before we have the chance to mold them.  Soon after my second son was born, I remember being astounded at how differently he and his brother would respond to the same situation.  As they grew older and their personalities took shape even more, I realized dealing them in exact same way often does not work. Altering my parenting style is often necessary, especially when getting them to open up.  For instance, while my middle son will talk the ear off most willing listeners, my eldest rarely gives more than a one word answer when asked about his day.  While being guarded isn’t always a bad thing, it is important to me that he doesn’t get bottled up.  As a tween life can run the gamut of emotions. Our children often have the additional burden of processing other people’s microaggressions and stereotypes that aren’t always easy for a young mind to understand. It is important to me that my son knows I am available to listen whenever he needs me.  Here are some tricks I have learned to get my son to open up:

1. Create a judgment-free zone.

I found some of what fuels my son’s unwillingness to open up is a fear of being judged.  He is extremely sensitive and when he speaks, is it very important to him that he feels heard and not judged for his feelings or actions. If my husband or I rush to a conclusion about something he has confided in us, he grows emotional or worse, he shuts down.

As a parent, it is instinctual to want to protect your child.  Often that means listening to them with some level of judgment. We all do it. We want to make sure they are making the right choices when they aren’t with us, and if they tell us something that we know may lead to harm, our first instinct is to get them back on the right path.  However, I have learned to be gentle in that guidance when it comes to my guarded son. I start by letting him know how much I value his honesty. I also consistently let him know he can talk to me about anything and everything and I will (try my best to) listen without anger.  Rather than lecturing him immediately, I have learned to ask him questions that will lead him to the right conclusion. Instead of saying, you shouldn’t have done that.  I ask, what consequences do you think you could face? What do you think you could have done differently? These open-ended questions not only fuel the conversation, but they give him the intellectual freedom to draw his own conclusions without feeling judged.

2. Make one-on-one time.

I always know my son wants to talk when he volunteers to go with me on an errand.  It is usually a random request to ride with me to Target or walk with me to the cluster mailbox in our cul de sac.  As a family of four (soon to be five), it isn’t always easy for him to grab alone time with me or my husband.  I learned quickly that these seemingly small requests were his way of getting the alone time he craved. Inevitably, he starts talking.

When you have more than one child, alone time is important to all children, not just your introverted child.  Each child needs your undivided attention outside the often judgmental and immature ears of siblings.  When my middle son was in preschool, we discovered a local cafe that had a “cookie of the day.”  It was such a fun discovery for both of us because the place had little tables by the lake and plenty of space for him to run around. It became a regular ritual for us to go get a quick cookie during the time between when he was dismissed from school and when my oldest got out a few hours later. Even at four years old, it quickly turned into a time for us to talk.  Even if you can’t steal away time with your child, find small moments at home.  When my eldest was small, I would snuggle with him for a few moments in his room before he fell asleep.  Now, he has a later bedtime than his younger siblings so sometimes he spends it smashed between my husband and I on the couch giggling at a family-friendly TV show.  These moments provide him with an opportunity to open up to us about anything that may have been weighing on him throughout his day.

3. Be open about your own thoughts and feelings.

Last school year, my son had some issues with a few boys in school when they decided they didn’t want to play with him anymore.  He didn’t come right out and admit it bothered him but he mentioned the incident in passing with a small shrug.  I knew he was affected by it but he wasn’t quite comfortable being vulnerable enough to admit it.  Knowing that coaxing him would not work, I told him a story of a similar experience I had when a few girls in my elementary school treated me in a similar way.  It was surprisingly easy to dig back to that time and remember my own hurt and confusion.  He listened intently and it wasn’t long before he was echoing my feelings and asking me how I solved the problem.

Developing a relationship with your child is a two-way street. In order to gain their trust, it is often necessary to give them yours. By confiding in your child about your own insecurities and vulnerabilities, you allow them to see your humanity.  Building that foundation is crucial to breaking your introverted child out of their shell.

4. Give your child your full attention.

My sons ALWAYS know when I am distracted.  They call me on it and hold me accountable.  I work from home and have additional projects that make my schedule unconventional.  I would probably lose days on my computer if it weren’t for my children constantly reminding me to exist in reality.  Introverted children are particularly sensitive to distraction.  Opening up is not easy. When they do, it is important they have your full, undivided attention. If it’s not possible to drop everything when they need to talk, make sure you schedule a time when you can.  Don’t just say “we’ll talk later.” Give them specifics and make sure to follow through.  Scheduling a time to talk shows them that what they have to say is important to you and you will make it a priority to hear it.

What do you think, family? Share your tips and tricks for getting your child to open up in the comments below.  It takes a village!

 

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About The Author

Faye McCray is anMcCray_AuthorPhoto (1) attorney by day and writer all the time. Her work has been featured on My Brown Baby, AfroPunk, AfroNews, For HarrietMadame NoireBlack Girl NerdsBlack and Married with Kids, and other popular publications.  Faye also has a number of short stories and a full length novel available for purchase on Amazon.  Most importantly, Faye is a proud wife and mother to three beautiful and talented young boys who she is fiercely passionate about raising. You can find Faye on Twitter @fayewrites and on the web at fayemccray.com.

Meet Lynquay Sanford: Incredible Mom and Entrepreneur Who Returned to School to Pursue Her Dreams

My own mother’s choice to achieve her dreams not only changed the opportunities available to me and my brothers, it motivated me to pursue my own dreams. When I heard Lynquay Sanford’s story of similar fortitude and grit for her own children, I knew I had to talk to her to learn more.

When I was nine, my mother went back to school to pursue her Bachelor’s degree in Political Science.  Just a few year earlier, she and my father went through a tough divorce, and she was left as the primary guardian of me and my two older brothers. Even as a kid, I understood the magnitude of her decision to go back to school.  I knew she had to overcome naysayers, self-doubt and the financial uncertainty of pursuing a degree while working full-time and raising three kids. My own mother’s choice to achieve her dreams not only changed the opportunities available to me and my brothers, it motivated me to pursue my own dreams.  When I heard Lynquay Sanford’s story of similar fortitude and grit for her own children, I knew I had to talk to her to learn more.

1. Tell us a little about yourself. Where are you from? Where do you live? How would people who know you describe you?

My name is Lynquay Sanford, and I was born and raised in Queens, NY. I currently reside in Wendell, NC. People would describe me as being very straight forward, funny, strong-willed, caring, loving, and a great friend and motivator. I am always open to new ideas. I am also a great mother to my children.

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2.What made you decide to go back to school?

I opened a Family Child Care Home because I wasn’t satisfied with the child care centers in my area that my son attended. I wanted to learn more about how I can help preschool children and bring quality education to my Family Child Care Home. I started off by taking one class that is required to operate a Family Child Care Home. I liked it so much that I decided to pursue a degree in Early Childhood Education.

3. What were you doing before you decided to go back to school?

I was an EMT and I worked at a level one trauma center in Raleigh, NC dispatching helicopters and transport ambulances.

4. How did you prepare to get your degree? For example, internships, certifications, application process. How much time did it take?

I received my Associate’s degree in Early Childhood Education in December 2015. I will continue on to pursue my Bachelor’s degree in Early Care and Education and or Human Development and Family Service. What prepared me for this was operating my Family Child Care Home. I stepped out on faith and started my childcare business. It may take me three years to receive my Bachelor’s degree as I will be taking classes online and at my own pace. The cost of pursing any degree is expensive; however, I’ve graduated debt free because I had a scholarship to attend school. I will also be on a scholarship when I return to school the fall of 2017.

5. What do you plan to do with/have you done with your degree?

My plan is to expand my Child Care home and open a Child Care Center and or ½ day preschool.

“I was going through a very difficult divorce and working 7 days a week the last two years of me being in school. I’ve wanted to throw in the towel many times, but I couldn’t help but look at my children, especially my daughter, to show them no matter how tough life gets never give up.”

6. Who was your biggest inspiration? Mentors? Family? Friends?

I have so many people that have inspired me into going back to school. I was introduced to a group of ladies, all African American, who owned child care centers and family child care homes. They inspired me to stay in school and obtain my degree. My child care consultant also stayed on me to stay in school. I also come from a long line of strong black females, including my mother, grandmother and aunt, that inspired me to follow my dreams.

7. What was your biggest motivation? In other words, what kept you going?

My children kept me going. I also had the support of my mother and close friends who stepped in to help me with my children while I attended school at night.

8. Did you experience any setbacks? How did you overcome them?

Yes, I had many setbacks. I was going through a very difficult divorce and working 7 days a week the last two years of me being in school. I’ve wanted to throw in the towel many times but I couldn’t help but look at my children, especially my daughter, to show them no matter how tough life gets never give up. Just take your time pray about what you are going through and keep on moving. I tell them all the time that God does not give you or put you through anything he thinks you cannot handle.

9. If you had a chance to go back in time and speak to your 15 year old self, a) would she be surprised to see where you are now? b) what would you say to her?

Surprised? Yes! I thought I wanted to be a Veterinarian. I did not know anything about owning anything at that age. I would tell my 15 year old self to stay head strong and that she can do anything she puts her mind to. I would tell her that she is stronger than she thinks she is.

“Don’t let people change your mind or put doubt in your mind. Surround yourself with people who will push you and not distract you from pursing your dreams.”

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10. What advice would you give to someone thinking about going back to school or going after any dream?

Do it. Don’t let people change your mind or put doubt in your mind. Surround yourself with people who will push you and not distract you from pursing your dreams. Surround yourself with people who will be honest with you when you have those weak moments from pursuing your dreams. Also, know that it will not be easy but if you want it bad enough, you can achieve it. Success does not happen overnight.

11. Any long term goals or dreams?

My long term goal is to stop working 7 days a week. My dream is to have several child care centers and half-day preschools that will service low income families and families with special needs children.

Check out Lynquay’s Family Child Care Home, Open Arms Daycare here.

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About The Author

Faye McCray is anMcCray_AuthorPhoto (1) attorney by day and writer all the time. Her work has been featured on My Brown Baby, AfroPunk, AfroNews, For HarrietMadame NoireBlack Girl NerdsBlack and Married with Kids, and other popular publications.  Faye also has a number of short stories and a full length novel available for purchase on Amazon.  Most importantly, Faye is a proud wife and mother to three beautiful and talented young boys who she is fiercely passionate about raising. You can find Faye on Twitter @fayewrites and on the web at fayemccray.com.

25 Positive Affirmations For Parents

Though the ability to parent is a gift and a blessing, it can also be tough. It’s easy for self doubt to creep in which can leave you questioning your ability and worthiness. Say these 25 positive affirmations to get you on the right track.

Though the ability to parent is a gift and a blessing, it can also be tough.  It’s easy for self doubt to creep in which can leave you questioning your ability and worthiness.  Say these 25 positive affirmations to get you on the right track.

  1. I love my child.

  2. I am loved.

  3. I am strong.

  4. I am reliable.

  5. I am capable.

  6. I am motivated by love in caring for my child.

  7. I act in my child’s best interests.

  8. I can manage my child’s needs.

  9. I show my children I love them.

  10. I enjoy my children.

  11. I respect my children.

  12. I challenge myself.

  13. I am not afraid.

  14. I am present.

  15. I have good judgment.

  16. I am intuitive.

  17. I am consistent.

  18. I am fair.

  19. I am patient and calm.

  20. I am worthy of self-care.

  21. I am worthy of respect.

  22. I am doing my best.

  23. I am inspiring.

  24. I am valued.

  25. I am needed.

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    About The Author

    Faye McCray is anMcCray_AuthorPhoto (1) attorney by day and writer all the time. Her work has been featured on My Brown Baby, AfroPunk, AfroNews, For HarrietMadame NoireBlack Girl NerdsBlack and Married with Kids, and other popular publications.  Faye also has a number of short stories and a full length novel available for purchase on Amazon.  Most importantly, Faye is a proud wife and mother to three beautiful and talented young boys who she is fiercely passionate about raising. You can find Faye on Twitter @fayewrites and on the web at fayemccray.com.

20 Life-Changing Quotes on Parenting

I didn’t know my capacity to love until I had my children. I didn’t know how fiercely I would fight to protect them. I didn’t know how motivated I would be to leave the world a better place. Parenting has inspired great thinkers, artists and activists past and present. Here are 20 quotes on parenting by some of the greats to give you inspiration and solidarity as you navigate rearing the loves of your lives.

I didn’t know my capacity to love until I had my children.  I didn’t know how fiercely I would fight to protect them. I didn’t know how motivated I would be to leave the world a better place.  Parenting has inspired great thinkers, artists and activists, past and present.  Here are 20 quotes on parenting by some of the greats to give you inspiration and solidarity as you navigate rearing the loves of your lives.

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1. “It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.” – Frederick Douglass

2. “Your children are not your children. They are the sons and daughters of Life’s longing for itself. They come through you but not from you and though they are with you they belong not to you. You may give them your love but not your thoughts, for they have their own thoughts. You may house their bodies but not their souls, for their souls dwell in the house of tomorrow, which you cannot visit, not even in your dreams. You may strive to be like them, but seek not to make them like you for life goes not backward nor tarries with yesterday. You are the bows from which your children as living arrows are sent forth.” – Kahlil Gibran

3. “My most important title is still mom-in-chief.  My daughters are still the heart of my heart and the center of my world.” – Michelle Obama

4. “Mother is a verb. It’s something you do. Not just who you are.” – Cheryl Lacey Donovan

5. “Your children need your presence more than your presents.” – Jesse Jackson

6. “The reality is that most of us communicate the same way that we grew up. That communication style becomes our normal way of dealing with issues, our blueprint for communication. It’s what we know and pass on to our own children. We either become our childhood or we make a conscious choice to change it.” – Kristen Crockett

7. “In a child’s eyes, a mother is a goddess. She can be glorious or terrible, benevolent or filled with wrath, but she commands love either way. I am convinced that this is the greatest power in the universe.” – N.K. Jemisin

8. “You don’t have favourites among your children, but you do have allies. ” – Zadie Smith

9. “When mother-cow is chewing grass its young ones watch its mouth” – Chinua Achebe

10. “To describe my mother would be to write about a hurricane in its perfect power. Or the climbing, falling colors of a rainbow.” – Maya Angelou

11. “Black people love their children with a kind of obsession. You are all we have, and you come to us endangered.” – Ta-Nehisi Coates

12. “Loving someone as fiercely as my mom loves me must be like wearing your heart outside of your body with no skin, no bones, no nothing to protect it.” – Nicola Yoon

13. “The best thing she was, was her children.” – Toni Morrison

14. “Beautiful is the man who leaves a legacy that of shared love and life. It is he who transfers meaning, assigns significance and conveys in his loving touch the fine art and gentle shaping of a life. This man shall be called, Father.” – Stella Payton

15. “Behind every great man is a man greater, his father.” – Habeeb Akande

16. “The kids who need the most love will ask for it in the most unloving of ways.” – Unknown

17. “Children learn more from what you are than what you teach.” – W.E.B. DuBois

18. “Family doesn’t have to be perfect. It doesn’t have to be flawless. It doesn’t have to be what you had in mind. You can’t control it. But it is a gymnasium for love to work out in.” – Bishop T.D. Jakes

19. “I tried to be the greatest boxer in the world and a good parent, too. I had instant feedback on my success as a boxer. Often, parents don’t really know if what they are doing is right or wrong until their child is grown and it is too late to change any of the decisions. Whatever my failings as a parent, I am very proud of all my children. It wasn’t easy for them to make their own way with such a controversial and public father.” – Muhammad Ali

20. “Children have never been very good at listening to their elders, but they have never failed to imitate them.” – James Baldwin

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About The Author

Faye McCray is anMcCray_AuthorPhoto (1) attorney by day and writer all the time. Her work has been featured on My Brown Baby, AfroPunk, AfroNews, For HarrietMadame NoireBlack Girl NerdsBlack and Married with Kids, and other popular publications.  Faye also has a number of short stories and a full length novel available for purchase on Amazon.  Most importantly, Faye is a proud wife and mother to three beautiful and talented young boys who she is fiercely passionate about raising. You can find Faye on Twitter @fayewrites and on the web at fayemccray.com.

Let’s Talk About Discipline

I am constantly questioning my discipling decisions. I want to raise strong men and in doing so, it is important to me they understand the consequences of poor decisions. Here are five things I have learned to ask myself when deciding whether I made the right choice.

I am constantly questioning my discipling decisions.  I want to raise strong men and in doing so, it is important to me they understand the consequences of poor decisions.  I want to get it right so I can prepare them to make better choices in the future. Here are five things I have learned to ask myself when deciding whether I made the right choice:

1. Was my decision made in love?

My father passed away this year and at his funeral I told a story about the last whooping he gave me.  It began after my sister dared me to stick my head in between the iron bars on a staircase in our childhood home and stupidly, I accepted.  To make a long story short, it involved Herculean strength from my father, Country Crock butter, screaming from my mother, lots of crying (mostly from me), and finally, a spanking.  

While I remember very little about the pain of the spanking,  I remember how scared everyone was around me, including my father.  Although my father could have chosen a different approach to disciplining me, the spanking was calculated.  He wanted me to understand the severity of my actions and never do it again.  He acted out of fear but he also acted out of love.  Sometimes we react emotionally to our children’s behavior.  That is okay.  As long as we take a moment to make sure they understand the action we are taking is also in love.  

2. Did I include my co-parent in my decision?

When my eldest son was younger, I would get upset with him for talking to his mother about “man” things.  I felt certain conversations were not appropriate for him to have with his mom, and I would tell him as much when we were in private.  My wife hated this because she wants our sons to feel like there is nothing they can not speak to her about.  By making it seem wrong to talk to their mother about certain subjects, I was limiting their relationship with their mom.

Everyone disagrees at some point while raising kids.  However, in most situations, it is safe to assume that both you and your co-parent have the best interests of your children at heart.  My wife understood I was doing what I thought was best.  However, we had to come to an agreement to ensure our boys grow into emotionally healthy young men.  Although it would be unrealistic to discuss every action you take with your spouse, it is paramount you check in regularly to make sure you stay on the same team.

3. Am I taking advantage of teachable moments?

I cringe when I attempt to resolve a frustrating moment with my boys by yelling, “Because I said so!”  That phrase doesn’t do anything to help my boys understand the reason why they should do the right thing.  My goal as a parent is to raise extraordinary men of good character.  I don’t help them get there if I am just asking for rote actions without purpose.  That would only last as long as I am in front of them.

In each mistake, there is an opportunity to learn.  Although discipline is important, be sure to take the time to explain to your children why they are being punished. Help them understand the mistake they made and why it is important to make a different choice next time.

4. Was the punishment just?

As father of three, I’d like to be fair.  However, I have learned that fairness isn’t always guaranteed.   As an example, when my children fight. My eldest always faces tougher consequences because as the oldest and largest, he has the potential to really hurt his younger sibling.  While my eldest may rail against the fact that I am being harsher with him, the reality is that the circumstances warrant it.

When I discipline my sons, I try to assess the circumstances and react accordingly.  Being just as a parent does not mean you have the exact same answer for every situation; it means you make the best choice based on the situation.

5. Knowing what I know now, would I do it again?

My children are incredibly inquisitive.  As a result, they are constantly challenging boundaries.  It is a gift and a curse. We want our sons to question the world around them.  At the same time, it would be much easier on my wife and I if they didn’t question everything.  I’ve been guilty of punishing my children out of frustration.  However, if I send my son to his room and when he returns, we are both questioning why I sent him, then that was probably not the right move.  

As of this writing, I have been a dad for a little over nine years.  I have made about 10,043 mistakes.  While I am proud of the job I do as dad, I have had moments where I could have been better.  I think its crucial to our growth as parents to constantly ask yourself, if faced with the same decision tomorrow, would I take the same action?

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About The Author

Rick McCray is a maRAMrried father of three amazing sons. He is also a proud graduate of Duke University where he holds a BA in History and African/African American History, and Howard University School of Law. He is also a regular commentator on the In The Black podcast.  Rick is passionate about our history and helping to educate our community concerning the great contributions of people of color to the world. You can find Rick on Twitter @RealRickMcCray.

Innovative and Resourceful Apps Created by Blerds

From a directory of books featuring characters of color, to a scholarship database, to a way to finally “unsend” a text message you regret, check out these innovative and resourceful apps created by Blerds!

From a directory of books featuring characters of color, to a scholarship database, to a way to finally “unsend” a text message you regret, check out these innovative and resourceful apps created by Blerds!

1. We Read Too

Price: Free

We Read Too is a book resource app created by Kaya Thomas that includes hundreds of children’s and YA books written by authors of color and featuring characters of color! This one is a must for the next trip to the library or bookstore! Available on iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch.

2. A Song for Miles

Price: $2.99

A Song for Miles, created by Tiffany Russell, Ph.D., is an interactive storybook that takes children on a colorful and musical journey through the lyrics of artists like Stevie Wonder, Earth, Wind, and Fire, and Marvin Gaye. According to the developer, “A Song for Miles nurtures children’s inquisitive nature and love of music and sounds, all while teaching valuable lessons such as “initiative, compassion, civility, respect, empathy, responsibility, and perseverance.” Available of iPhone, iPad and Kindle.

3. Where U

Price: Free

WhereU is a local business search app created by Dr. Dionne Mahaffey that connects users with local African American and Latino owned businesses for services such as house cleaning, catering, lawyers, doctors, graphic designers, beauty salons and more. According to the developer, the app includes a real-time leaderboard of black owned businesses across categories, ranked by peer-to-peer referral counts.  Available on iOS and Android.

4. Scholly

Price: Free with In-App Purchases (including a Scholly Account for $2.99)

Scholly is a college scholarship app created by Christopher Gray, Philadelphia native and son of a single mom, who won $1.3 million in scholarships as a senior in high school.  Finding the process difficult and time consuming Gray created Scholly to make things much easier. Gray landed a deal with Daymond John and Lori Greiner on Shark Tank growing his app to #1 overall for three weeks! Actor and activist Jesse William recently joined Scholly on the Board of Directors. Most importantly, however, Scholly has helped students and families find over $50 million in scholarship money to go college! Available on iOS and Android.

5. On Second Thought

Price: Free

On Second Thought is a mobile messaging app that was created by Maci Peterson which lets you take back text messages before they get to the other person’s phone.  The app allows for a grace period of up to 60 seconds after a message has been sent before it is actually sent to the other person’s phone to allow you to change your mind. You can also program a curfew that stops messages from being sent after a certain hour. Available on Android (iPhone Beta in progress).

 

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About The Author

Faye McCray is anMcCray_AuthorPhoto (1) attorney by day and writer all the time. Her work has been featured on My Brown Baby, AfroPunk, AfroNews, For HarrietMadame NoireBlack Girl NerdsBlack and Married with Kids, and other popular publications.  Faye also has a number of short stories and a full length novel available for purchase on Amazon.  Most importantly, Faye is a proud wife and mother to three beautiful and talented young boys who she is fiercely passionate about raising. You can find Faye on Twitter @fayewrites and on the web at fayemccray.com.

20 Quotes to Inspire Young Women

Sometimes you need to call on the words of our great ancestors and elders for motivation and inspiration. Here are 20 quotes by amazing women to inspire you and the young girls in your life.

Sometimes you need to call on the words of our great ancestors and elders for motivation and inspiration. Here are 20 quotes by amazing women to inspire you and the young girls in your life.

1.  “I will not have my life narrowed down. I will not bow down to somebody else’s whim or to someone else’s ignorance.” – bell hooks

2.  “In every crisis there is a message. Crises are nature’s way of forcing change — breaking down old structures, shaking loose negative habits so that something new and better can take their place.” — Susan L. Taylor

3.  “When I dare to be powerful – to use my strength in the service of my vision, then it becomes less and less important whether I am afraid.” – Audre Lorde

4.  “A lot of people refuse to do things because they don’t want to go naked, don’t want to go without guarantee. But that’s what’s got to happen. You go naked until you die.” – Nikki Giovanni

5. “No person is your friend who demands your silence, or denies your right to grow.” – Alice Walker

6. “Think like a queen. A queen is not afraid to fail. Failure is another steppingstone to greatness.” – Oprah Winfrey

7. “Winning is great, sure, but if you are really going to do something in life, the secret is learning how to lose. Nobody goes undefeated all the time. If you can pick up after a crushing defeat, and go on to win again, you are going to be a champion someday.” – Wilma Rudolph

8. “Deal with yourself as an individual worthy of respect, and make everyone else deal with you the same way.” – Nikki Giovanni

9. “Once we recognize what it is we are feeling, once we recognize we can feel deeply, love deeply, can feel joy, then we will demand that all parts of our lives produce that kind of joy.” – Audre Lorde

10. “Someone was hurt before you, wronged before you, hungry before you, frightened before you, beaten before you, humiliated before you, raped before you…yet, someone survived…You can do anything you choose to do.” – Maya Angelou

11. “The thing that makes you exceptional, if you are at all, is inevitably that which must also make you lonely.” – Lorraine Hansberry

12. “It’s not the load that breaks you down, it’s the way you carry it.” – Lena Horne

13. “We have to talk about liberating minds as well as liberating society.” – Angela Davis

14. “Nothing will work unless you do.” – Maya Angelou

15. “Don’t feel entitled to anything you didn’t sweat and struggle for.”  – Marian Wright Edelman

16. “There’s always something to suggest that you’ll never be who you wanted to be. Your choice is to take it or keep on moving.” – Phylicia Rashad

17. “You don’t make progress by standing on the sidelines, whimpering and complaining. You make progress by implementing ideas.” – Shirley Chisholm

18. “Sometimes you’ve got to let everything go—purge yourself . . . If you are unhappy with anything . . . whatever is bringing you down, get rid of it. Because you’ll find that when you’re free, your true creativity, your true self comes out.” – Tina Turner

19. “I really don’t think life is about the I-could-have-beens. Life is only about the I-tried-to-do. I don’t mind the failure but I can’t imagine that I’d forgive myself if I didn’t try.” – Nikki Giovanni

20. “I am not tragically colored. There is no great sorrow dammed up in my soul, nor lurking behind my eyes. . . . Even in the helter-skelter skirmish that is my life, I have seen that the world is to the strong regardless of a little pigmentation more or less. No, I do not weep at the world—I am too busy sharpening my oyster knife.” – Zora Neale Hurston

 

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About The Author

Faye McCray is anMcCray_AuthorPhoto (1) attorney by day and writer all the time. Her work has been featured on My Brown Baby, AfroPunk, AfroNews, For HarrietMadame NoireBlack Girl NerdsBlack and Married with Kids, and other popular publications.  Faye also has a number of short stories and a full length novel available for purchase on Amazon.  Most importantly, Faye is a proud wife and mother to three beautiful and talented young boys who she is fiercely passionate about raising.

8 Kid Geniuses, Innovators and Entrepreneurs You Need to Know

This extraordinary group of kids and teens have already accomplished more than most adults in a lifetime. Here are 8 gifted humans who are sure to inspire you and your little ones!

This extraordinary group of kids and teens have already accomplished more than most adults in a lifetime! Here are 8 gifted humans who are sure to inspire you and your little ones:

2. Boffin Ramami Wilfred

Rammami

Dubbed “Britain’s Smartest Schoolboy” in 2014, 11 year old Ramami scored a 162 on an IQ test, higher than Stephen Hawking, Bill Gates and Albert Einstein!  Ramami’s mom knew he wasn’t the average child when his favorite book as a toddler was the encyclopedia.  Ramami’s incredible scores allowed him to be a member of Mensa, an organization open to folks who score in the 98th percentile or higher on an IQ or other approved intelligence test.

On his tremendous achievement, Ramami said:

“I believe that having a high IQ isn’t that important unless you do something really special with it.”

3. Rochelle Ballantyne

rochelle-ballantyne.pf_.jpg

In 2012, at just 17 years old, Rochelle was the only girl featured in Brooklyn Castle, a documentary about inner-city students that ranked among the nation’s top chess players. At the time, she was in the 99th percentile of American junior players!  When asked what was driving her, Rochelle said:

“My grandmother. When I first started playing, she introduced to me the idea of being the first African-American female chess master. I didn’t think about it much because for me it seemed like an impossible feat, and I didn’t think it could happen. I wasn’t as focused and dedicated as I am now. I didn’t think I was a good chess player—people told me I was, but it wasn’t my mentality at that moment. But then after she died, that really affected me, because she was the one person that always had confidence in me. She never pushed me, and she always respected me for who I was. I have to reach that goal for her.”

This amazing young lady is currently an undergraduate at Stanford University double majoring in Political Science and African American Studies.  She is interested in “helping to give voice to those who are often neglected or ignored.

6. Jaylen Bledsoe

jaylenbledsoe

At just 12 years old, Jaylen started his own information technology consulting business with $100.  Now, at 17 years old, Jaylen has built a $3.5 Million dollar global enterprise as an investor, motivational speaker and business development consultant.

On his success, Jaylen said:

“I don’t find anyone that’s going to demean me… who is going to bring me down. [I only find] people who bring me up to make my purpose prosper.”

Check out his powerful interview with T.D. Jakes below:

8. Daquan Chisholm

Daquan

In 2007, at just 10 years old, Baltimore native Daquan Chisholm attended a three week course called “Inventions” and was tasked with creating his own invention.  He created a bullet-proof police helmet with a built-in walkie talkie to keep police safe.  Although he didn’t have enough money to patent his idea, his invention gave him a sense of drive and motivation knowing that one day he had it in him to make the world a better place.

He hopes to motivate others to do good and stand out.  He wants kids like him to know:

“If you feel you have something special, just share it with the world.”

In 2015, Daquan was a senior in high school hoping to attend college and attain a degree in engineering or natural sciences.

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About The Author

Faye McCray is anMcCray_AuthorPhoto (1) attorney by day and writer all the time. Her work has been featured on My Brown Baby, AfroPunk, AfroNews, For HarrietMadame NoireBlack Girl NerdsBlack and Married with Kids, and other popular publications.  Faye also has a number of short stories and a full length novel available for purchase on Amazon.  Most importantly, Faye is a proud wife and mother to three beautiful and talented young boys who she is fiercely passionate about raising.

20 Positive Affirmations to Start Your Child’s Day

Send your children (and yourself) out into the world with these positive affirmations for a great start to any day!

A positive mindset is the best way to start your day. Though navigating this world can be unpredictable, starting off your day with the right frame of mind can prepare you to handle whatever comes your way. Send your children (and yourself) out into the world with these positive affirmations for a great start to any day!

1. I am loved.

2. I am brave.

3. I make good choices.

4. I am happy.

5. I am smart.

6. I work hard.

7. I learn from my mistakes.

8. I am a good friend.

9. I am honest.

10. I am responsible.

11. I am proud.

12. I am a good listener.

13. I am handsome/beautiful.

14. I am a problem solver.

15. I am calm.

16. I am strong.

17. I am creative.

18. I believe in myself.

19. I respect others.

20. I respect myself.

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About The Author

Faye McCray is anMcCray_AuthorPhoto (1) attorney by day and writer all the time. Her work has been featured on My Brown Baby, AfroPunk, AfroNews, For HarrietMadame NoireBlack Girl NerdsBlack and Married with Kids, and other popular publications.  Faye also has a number of short stories and a full length novel available for purchase on Amazon.  Most importantly, Faye is a proud wife and mother to three beautiful and talented young boys who she is fiercely passionate about raising.